Cat Town Cafe

img_4162Cat Town started in 2011 as a rescue organization in Oakland, California, placing cats in foster homes and eventually helping them find permanent homes. In 2014, the Cat Town Cafe and Adoption Center opened. The cafe provides space for up to 20 cats and brings in potential adopters; nearly 1400 cats have found homes through Cat Town since 2011.

Cat Town is a nonprofit organization, and matching cats with people is clearly their mission. The cafe contains an area with a couple of tables where one can buy coffee, cookies, and bagels. Cats are in a separate cat zone that is viewable through a glass wall. The cat zone is clean, well lit, and decorated with colorful murals and models of local landmarks. Volunteers are on hand to answer questions about the cats and to talk to potential adopters. There are no tables and only a few chairs (mostly taken by cats), so it’s not a cafe where one would come to sit and chat with a friend or read a book. However, it’s very much a place where one can get some quality cat-petting time.

In addition to the main room, there is a smaller room with alcoves for the more timid cats. Only two visitors are allowed in the room at one time, and there is a sign indicating that one should be quiet to permit the cats to relax.

There is a fee of $10/hour to visit if booking online in advance. It’s only $5/hour for drop-ins, but they were quite busy the week I was looking to book online, so I’d recommend making a reservation. And as a nonprofit, the fee you pay to visit is tax deductible!

Location: 2869 Broadway, Oakland, CA 94611
Cafe hours: Wednesday-Sunday, 10:00-19:00
Cat zone hours: Wednesday-Sunday, 9:30-19:00; Monday & Tuesday by appointment for adoptions
Admission charge: $10/hour when booked online; $5/hour for walk-ins
Reservations: Recommended
Price of a coffee (no lattes): $3.00

You also might want to check out Hood Cats, a side project of Adam Myott, one of the founders of Cat Town. I was mighty happy a few weeks ago when the Hood Cats calendar turned up in my mailbox.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cat Café Budapest (District VI)

There are two unrelated cat cafes in Budapest of the same name. This review is for the one located in District VI at Révay u. 3.

Three Maine Coons and seven mixed-breed rescue cats are permanent residents of Cat Café Budapest. The cafe is very large, consisting of a front room with regular tables and chairs, a back room with lounge seating and a variety of cat-climbing structures, and additional tables on a second level.

A wide variety of drinks are on offer, including 18 types of tea (770 Ft or $2.80), a variety of flavored espresso-based drinks, hot chocolate, beer, cocktails, and soda. One unusual drink is the cat-puccino, flavored with peanut butter and cinnamon. I didn’t try it, so I can’t judge whether coffee and peanut butter make a good combo! Let me know if you are brave enough to sample it.

Food is limited to cakes (740 Ft or $2.70 at 275 forint to the dollar), panini (890 Ft or $3.25), and a few other baked goods. The cafe is located in the city center, so it would be a convenient spot for an afternoon snack and a rest after spending the morning walking around the city. There was a “full” sign on the window and a line outside when I first tried to visit, so a reservation would be wise if you have only a limited amount of time. On my second attempt the cafe was half empty, meaning more one-on-one time with the cats.

Location: Révay u. 3., 1065 Budapest
Hours: Every day, 10:00 – 21:00
Admission charge: No
Reservations: Yes
Price of a latte: 750 Ft ($2.75)

 

 

Cat Cafe (Budapest)

Note: There are two spots called Cat Cafe located in Budapest. This review is for the one located at Damjanich utca 38.

Walking into Cat Cafe is like entering the home of someone who clearly loves his or her cats and lets them rule the house. There are scratching posts, cat toys, and empty cardboard boxes strewn about. The chairs have scratch marks, and after sitting on the sofa you might want to use one of the cafe’s rollers to remove fur from your clothes. The decor is simple and not over-stylized, but you’re probably looking at the cats more than anything else anyway.

The cafe has four permanent resident cats who were all being lazy and doing what cats do when I visited at around 2 pm. Luna, a British Shorthair, was extremely cute (that face!) but it was impossible for me to win her over. She lolled about and showed her belly, only to then resist my pats. Oh, cats! I had better luck with the others, especially Sushi, a huge Maine Coon who was happy to get some ear scratches.

Service was friendly, and the woman who was working explained the system to me in English. There’s a set price for a slice of cake and as many drinks as you wish. It’s also possible to get one glass of beer. Cake options included lemon cream, chocolate cream, and honey and nut cream. I ordered the chocolate, and it reminded me of a more grown-up version of the Ho Hos I ate as a kid. I also got a cappuccino, which arrived decorated with a cat face.

There’s no time limit on a stay, and there are some board and card games available. The cafe has two rooms. The front room has regular tables as well as two seats at a low table a few steps up in the window alcove. The back room has sofas. The cafe is below ground level, making it a bit tricky to get well-lit photos, particularly in the back room.

Location: Damjanich utca 38, 1071 Budapest

Hours: Wednesday & Thursday 2 pm – 8 pm; Friday 2 pm – 10 pm; Saturday noon – 10 pm; Sunday noon – 8 pm

Admission charge: 1790 Ft (approximately $6.50), with various discounts are available for seniors, students, children, admission after 8 pm, etc.; cash only

Reservations: Possible by email on their website

Price for a latte: N/A

 

Café Miao

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Katte latte

Café Miao is Denmark’s first cat cafe and the site of my introduction to cat art in milk foam. It is home to seven friendly permanent residents: Stoffer, Åse, Peter, Guffe, Tiger, Panter, and Snehvide. The cafe wasn’t very crowded when I visited in the middle of a weekday, so the cat to human ratio was quite high. I suspect the cats have a taste that is a bit more traditional than that of the average Danish person, as the design of the place leans toward cat-cozy rather than the more customary modern Danish style.

 

Food options include burgers, a brunch plate, various udon noodle dishes, sandwiches, and salad. It looked to be standard cafe fare, with the bonus of cat-shaped buns for the sandwiches. I was tempted to order the veggie burger ($15), but I opted to stick to only a latte. The Copenhagen food scene is bursting with amazing eating spots, and I wanted to sample as many as possible during my 5-day visit. Plus I know I get so distracted by cats that finishing my coffee before it’s cold is enough of a feat.

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Blue Cat Cafe

It was pure luck that I landed in Blue Cat Cafe. A friend and I stumbled on it while walking home to our Airbnb late at night during a trip to Austin. Of course I insisted it be our first stop the next morning.

The cafe was started with funds from a Kickstarter campaign and sports both good food and creative decor. Yes, it’s a bit over the top cat-crazy, but in a good way. In typical Austin style, the food comes from a food truck and includes a variety of vegan Tex-Mex dishes. Coffee drinks are also all vegan. Visitors order outside, and servers bring everything in when it’s ready. It’s also possible to eat out in the courtyard.

Some of the cats are adoptable, while others are permanent residents. A three-collar system identifies the status of each cat. Those with green collars are in need of homes. A red collar indicates that a cat is in the process of being adopted. The remaining cats are permanent residents.

Location: 95 Navasota Street, Austin, TX, USA

Opening hours: Monday through Thursday, 10 am – 9 pm; Friday and Saturday 10 am – 10 pm; Sunday 11 am – 7 pm

Admission charge: $3

Reservations: No

Cats: Some are adoptable though the Blue Cat Foundation

Price for a small latte: $3.00